Archives for the month of: May, 2019

Having the ability to start fast is one of the ways triathlon swimming is different to pool swim racing.  You can get a significant advantage by getting yourself in a good position with a fast start, either by getting away from the washing machine of the mass start or by getting into a group where you can draft effectively.  This week we will be doing some positive split 200s to practise fast starts.

They are called positive split 200s to contrast them from negative split swims we normally do where we try and finish the second half of a swim slightly faster than the first half.  One of the tricks to making fast starts effective is having good awareness of those around you and putting in short bursts of speed to either get away from someone you don’t want on your feet or bridging a gap to a swimmer ahead.  Try and practise this awareness when you do the set this week by leaving 5s between swimmers (if possible in your lane) and practising catching the swimmer ahead.

See you Saturday!

Rob

Photo by Jon Del Rivero on Unsplash

 

 

I have a new challenge for you this week – inspired by Alex and Pete and also based on a set I did many years ago when swimming for Wycombe Masters.  It’s based on the Beep Test that you may have done in a gym to test your fitness.  A traditional Beep Test consists of short interval runs, with timed intervals getting ever shorter, with a beep telling you when to start the next interval.  You keep going until you can’t make the it to the start before the next beep.

In my swim variant of the Beep Test the objective is the same – try and make as many of the reducing turnaround times as possible until you can’t do any more.  We will start with 100s swum off a comfortable turnaround time.  Each subsequent 100 will be swum with 5s less rest.  Do as many 100s as you can until you can’t make the turnaround time any more.  Then drop back to doing 50s off the still reducing turnaround time.  These will feel comfortable again for a while until the turnaround times get tighter again and the challenge is to do as many 50s as you can make to the end of the set.  Please drop out when you can no longer make the turnaround times to ensure the lane stays together for the whole set.

Please swim this set off strict 5s intervals between swimmers if there are 8 or fewer swimmers per lane.  If there are more you will need to reduce the gap between swimmers to 3s but it will be easier to check your time and know whether or not you have made the turnaround time with 5s intervals.

See you Saturday!

Rob

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

Many of us will have an A-race, which is the race we aim to perform at our best during the season.  We may also have a B-race or another important qualification race.  You will often taper off the quantity and duration of your training before these races to perform at your best, so I expect many of you to either swim shorter sessions on Saturdays or swim them at much lower intensity.  However, most of us race much more than twice a year so should you taper before other races too if it’s not your A or B race?  Only you can judge what is right for you based on your race plan but I would encourage you to continue training hard before some races to help you judge the right taper for your A and B races.

This week we will be returning to the ratchet set we did a few weeks ago which is a 1,500m main set with the intervals swum at reducing rest intervals.  Enjoy trying to use the set to practise your easy-speed by relaxing and saving some effort for the last few reps where the turnaround times start to get really right.

See you Saturday!

Rob

 

Photo by Victoire Joncheray on Unsplash

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