Archives for the month of: February, 2019

Well done for all of your efforts last week in the Will Clarke set of fast and steady 50s.  One of the things I really like about that set is how comfortable it feels on the steady-paced 50s even though you are still swimming pretty quickly.  This feeling is what I call easy-speed.  This week we are going to return to main set of “Prime 100s” to help practise more easy-speed.

The Prime 100s set is one of the longest main sets we do and mixes slightly faster 100s on the prime numbered 100s (2, 3, 5, 7, 11, etc) with steady steadier paced 100s on the others.  If you did the time trials this year you will know your Critical Swim Speed (CSS) and the faster ones should be about 2s faster than your CSS and the slower ones 2s slower.  For those that don’t know your CSS, it is roughly the pace that you can sustain for about 30 minutes of continuous swimming.  The variation in pace on the set this week should give you more chance to search for easy-speed. So relax and enjoy the search!

See you Saturday!

Rob

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Well done for all of your efforts last week on what was a pretty tough main set of speed endurance work.  I also really liked the good lane choices some of you made after reading the session – some moving down a lane and others challenging themselves to make some turnaround times they have not achieved before.

This week you will have a similar challenge as we take on the Will Clarke set of fast and slow 50s.  The secret to this set is making sure you are able to change pace and not just hang on to make the turnaround times all at the same pace.  Better swimmers are usually better than weaker swimmers at having a good chance of pace between warm-up, endurance and sprint pace swimming and this is a good set to work on that change of pace.  But that is only possible if you choose a turnaround time where you are challenged and can also vary your pace.

See you Saturday!

Rob

We are in to the busy time of year where we have very full lanes so it is particularly challenging to ensure we all get a good swim.  To be fair to everyone, please do try and follow some simple rules as much as possible:

  1. Please turn up on time if at all possible.  It is disruptive to other swimmers if you are late, especially when the lanes are very full.  I know it is not always possible for everyone to turn up on time, due to family commitments and the like, but please do if you can.
  2. Please sign in and pay, for the lane you plan to swim in, before getting in the water.  The sign-up sheet should tell you which lanes have space if people correctly sign in.
  3. Please be flexible and consider moving lane if appropriate.  Everyone in the pool should be able to get a good workout in a faster or slower lane than their normal lane.  In a faster lane you may need to miss out some of the reps and keep out of the way of faster swimmers some times.  When swimming in a slower lane you may need to put more effort in to each rep to get a similar training effect from the set.

This week we will be doing some speed endurance 100s to continue the faster-paced work we started last week after some more practice on higher stroke rate drills in the warm up.  See you Saturday!

Rob

Well done for everyone who made the effort to do the time trials last week.  You should now have some excellent data on your stroke rate (in strokes per minute) and distance per stroke (in metres).  If you missed the time trials then you can measure these variables yourself in a public session by counting and using a stopwatch.  Or come along to the next time trials at the end of March.

As most of you will know, swimming fast is all governed by a very simple equation:

speed = stroke rate x distance per stroke

So those of you doing 60 strokes per minute and averaging 1m per stroke will be going 60m per minute, which is 1min 40s pace per 100m.  This equation tells you that increasing either stroke rate or distance per stroke  will make you go faster (while holding the other variable at a similar level).

We’ve been thinking a lot about technique improvements that improve your distance per stroke so far this winter and now I want to focus more on stroke rate as we pick up the pace towards race season.  So this week we will do some drills to get you swimming at a higher stroke rate.  Don’t worry about your distance per stroke when doing the drills but do try and carry the faster stroke rate into the following swim sets at a similar distance per stroke that you usually swim.  Try and think of it like spinning in an easy gear on the bike.  Getting used to a higher cadence on a bike can often be more efficient and make you go faster overall, as many of you know, and a similar thing can true for many of us when we swim.

See you Saturday!

Rob

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