Archives for the month of: November, 2018

An EVF is important to set up you for the underwater pull but only fully effective if you use that good EVF position to get the power from the push phase of your underwater stroke.  This is what I would like you to focus on during the session this week.  Aim to keep your vertical arm accelerating and pushing the water straight backwards right to the end of the push-phase.  Engage your core for extra power during the push.

To help we will be building up from drills focusing on the EVF catch and then into full strokes with the push as well.  As part of these drills we will be trying a new drill called catch-catch pull that was in one of the videos I shared a couple of weeks ago from Effortless Swimming.  Look at the video below from 3:46 onwards for a demonstration:

In December I will be alternating the sessions I swim and coach to give the 7am session a chance for some coaching.  This week I will coach the 7am session and swim during the 8am session and change next week.

See you Saturday!

Rob

 

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It’s time trials this week and I’d like you to focus on doing your time trial with good technique.  Maintaining good technique at speed, especially the EVF, is one of the most challenging things we can do and also one of the most effective things you can do to swim faster.

Also, I would like you to not worry about your time and be more interested in seeing what your distance per stroke and stroke rate (measured in strokes per minute) is.  Knowing your distance per stroke and stroke rate will provide a good baseline to measure changes against as we work on other aspects of your stroke over the winter.

See you Saturday!

Rob

Well done to everyone that has been brave enough to watch yourself on video and see what your stroke really looks like rather than what it feels like you are doing.  We have one more week of video and EVF drills before our first time trials of the Winter and I will write a bit more about what I am looking for in the time trials next week.

Back to this week, though, and the most common question I get on EVF is what should a good EVF look like?  If you look at many elite swimmers like Rebecca Adlington or Sun Yang on Youtube you will see extreme examples of what is possible for EVF by the very best in the world.  Few of us are ever likely to get near these extreme EVF positions but all of us can improve and get better.  And for many of us, improving EVF is one thing that is likely to make a big difference in swimming speed and efficiency, which is why I bang on about it so much!

So what should an EVF position look like for a regular swimmer?  The picture below is a clip from an Effortless Swimming video analysis of Triathlon Taren, who I know some of you follow.  The straight red line from his shoulder to wrist shows where he is with his catch at present and he is aiming to improve by getting to more of the bent red-line position shown on top of it.  You can watch the full video podcast showing this from this link.  

So how do you improve your EVF?  Many different drills can help and we have been practising many of those that I think can work well.  The following video from Effortless Swimming is also excellent and well worth a watch.  I particularly like the suggestion about shoulder position to help with a good EVF position, which is something you can all try this week.

After the EVF drills this week we will be doing an aerobic set of 200s, 150s and 100s before doing some pull-back sprints to finish.  I will be using lane 1 again this week for more video work during the pull-back sprints for anyone else that wants to be filmed.

See you Saturday!

Rob

It’s been great to see how keen many of you are to work on improving your technique and I’m conscious I’ve been giving you some quite challenging drills to work on EVF.  Well done for trying these – we will be doing some more of them this week – as improvements in EVF are the biggest improvement in speed and efficiency that could be made for many of you.  If there is one thing I would encourage everyone to aim for when doing these drills it is to do them slowly and as relaxed as possible.  I know this is hard as some of these drills are challenging.  Please persevere and try and get just a bit more comfortable and relaxed doing them this week.

Also, do think have an underwater video taken if you haven’t already.  I know it can be a bit uncomfortable to watch as I find it exactly the same.  However, if you can get past the discomfort it is a great way to see the difference between what it feels like you are doing and what you are actually doing in the water.  And getting a video done now is a great way of getting a baseline to compare against when you try and make some changes.  This week I will be using lane 4 at the end of both sessions to do some filming so please ask me if you are interested.  I will keep bringing the camera for the next few weeks if there is not enough time this week.

See you Saturday!

Rob

PS  Do watch the Rebecca Adlington video again if you want a reminder of one of the best examples of EVF to suit a long and relaxed, fast and efficient front crawl.

We will be doing more work this week on the high-elbow catch with some more drills we haven’t done for a while, namely double-arm pull, sideline kick with a quarter stroke to catch, and reverse doggy paddle with rotation.  These drills form a nice progression through the key elements of the high-elbow catch in different body positions.  Please do them as a progression as follows:

  • Double-arm pull: Pause at the EVF position and check your forearm is vertical in the water, with your elbow pointing forwards, before pressing through the rest of the pull.  This is best done with a pull buoy and head down without breathing – so take your time to allow you to do as much as possible without breathing.
  • Sideline kick with a quarter stroke to catch: This is all about getting into the EVF position on your side in the sideline kick position.  Do not put any effort into the pull (as you shouldn’t anyway when getting to the catch position) as this drill is all about getting to the EVF position before you start to apply the power.
  • Reverse doggy paddle with rotation:  Do this by starting with your arms by your sides and do doggy paddle but finishing each stroke with both arms by your side again.  Pause at EVF and check you have a good EVF before starting the push at the end of the stroke.  This puts together the EVF work of the previous drills combined with the rotation that is part of a good full stroke.

The main set is an aerobic pyramid and we will finish with some 25m sprints.  We will use only lanes 2, 3 and 4 for the sprints as I will use lane 1 for videoing anyone that wants to be recorded.  I would strongly encourage anyone that wants recording to take advantage of this.  Doing this regularly is a great way to check on your stroke as it often feels very different to what it looks like.  Helen filmed me racing last weekend and it was a great way of spotting some errors I make in my stroke when racing that I will be working on over the Winter.

See you Saturday!

Rob

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